Two Thousand Eight English Lesson

See that title? That’s how you’re supposed to say it. The “and” is unnecessary (as in “two thousand and eight”).

 A number can be a noun: “I wish you a healthy and prosperous 2008.”

Or an adjective: “Nice car. Is that the 2008 model?”

Either way, skip the “and.”

Do you say “and”? It’s not the end of the world, and I refuse to be that guy who corrects people, like:

“Man, I just lost seven hundred and forty-nine dollars on that horse. I think I’m gonna cry.”

Um, actually, that’s seven hundred forty-nine, suck it up.”

It just makes me feel good to know that teachers at private grammar schools and the Nation of Islam both approve of my everyday language skills.

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6 responses to “Two Thousand Eight English Lesson

  1. I hope you had a good two-thousand-and-seven and that your two-thousand-and-eight is even better and happy new year 😉

    “That” is another heavily over used and often unnecessary word. But whose counting.

  2. Yeah, anyone who attempts to correct grammar is going out on a limb.

    I had a (now deceased) college professor who said “basically” was overused in society. He insisted we use other words instead or completely omit it. The result: now I use the word “essentially” too often. Any more words worth mentioning?

  3. I thought that I remembered learning that you do not say “and” with two thousand eight. It’s been driving me crazy. On TV I constantly hear them saying two thousand and eight. I started thinking that I had remembered the wrong thing! So, thank you for making this information available. I don’t care what anybody else does–I just like to know that I am saying the right thing. How anal!!!! Thanks.

  4. Very good, i’m learning english, and often i use unnecessary words.
    I need find other blogs like this for learn fast ‘n’ quickly.
    So thanks!

  5. Just proof reading my daughter’s wedding invites — they have two thousand and eight — I thank you — it will be changed to — two thousand eight!

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